Reading through the Bible together

Friday, June 8, 2012

Go to previous reading  Exodus 3  Go to next reading

The Bible

Bible Blog

There are two ways you can respond to a wilderness experience: you can let it destroy you, or you can let it refine you. 

 

In Chapter 2, Moses was a confident 40-year-old crown prince who had life by the tail. Now Moses is a meek 80-year-old in the middle of nowhere doing a work that no proud Egyptian would have done: tending sheep. And they aren’t even his own sheep; they’re his wife’s father’s sheep. The loser son-in-law who can’t even find work of his own!

 

While Moses’ life right now might appear embarrassing by our own standards, there are two things that Moses is doing right.  First, Moses is staying humble. He’s no longer a prideful Egyptian. Second, Moses is keeping busy. When you’re in a wilderness period, this is exactly what you should be doing: staying humble and keeping busy.

 

With Moses now in a condition where he can be used, the Lord meets him on Mount Sinai in the mysterious form of an angel. The literal translation of the “the angel of the Lord” is actually “the angel that is Yahweh.” Does this mean that Yahweh is an angel?  No. God is omnipresent and is not limited to any physical space. That’s a good thing—we wouldn’t want a God who’s limited to one space. We want a God who’s everywhere.       

 

But there are also times when God who is everywhere at once also chooses to reveal Himself differently.  So here he apparently takes the form of an angel in one place to reveal Himself to Moses. Notice in verse 4 that God appears to be everywhere and somewhere at once:  “When the Lord saw that he had gone over to look, God called to him from within the bush.”  A God that is everywhere and yet right here and now—all at the same time.  

 

What are some things that, in your heart, you know are holding you back from being fully used by God?  Based on what others have told you (not your own feelings), what do you think God might be preparing you to do?

 

Andy Nash

School of Journalism & Communication

Southern Adventist University